Law Enforcement Specialties >> Communications Center >> How do you guys do it????

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How do you guys do it????

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Ccso-patch_max50

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Posted over 6 years ago

 

I visited my county's dispatch center on one of my ride alongs and I was seriously amazed by what the people working there do. I have no clue how you dispatchers do what you do. When i went in there i expected to see like hundreds of people all at desks, but I saw no more than 20 people in front of computer screens on headsets. I seriously think that dispatchers are heroes that are behind the scenes, thanks for all that you guys do.

Blue_hills_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

Thanks for your post and comments. Not sure why no one responded...I'm a noob here and just trying to catch up a little.


It's not an easy job and the fact you noticed that is much appreciated.


 

Policecross_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

Thank you!  Very nice to hear from someone :)


The job is very rewarding though; that makes the hard work worth it all

El_matador_max50

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+1

Rated +1 | Posted over 6 years ago

 

Without them life would be very tough!  Always make sure you take care of 'em!

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

it takes a special kind of person to do this job. Some people are cut out for it and some  aren't.

Incog2_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

I never saw this one!!


 


I totally appreciate your comments. We are considered the "unsung heroes" of emergency services. I have seen ads taken out in the newspaper thanking everyone and their dog for saving their childs life, but they forgot to than the dispatcher who gave CPR on the phone and stayed on the phone with a hysterical mom for 45 mins while the ambulance went to the northern most part of the county. But KNOWING that I had a huge part in doing these things is enough for me.


I LOVE my job. I couldnt consider doing anything else, and I forgot what it was like to have a "normal job". I get up every morning and put on my uniform and badge, and do what I do best. I use all my sweet skills that many people dont even consider me for, such as my huge tolerance level for stupid people and how I can save a life without shedding a single tear or breaking down. I have a combination of patience and pride. I walk into a grocery store and know how much I helped you when i see you perusing the veggies and smile a little, because you have no idea that the person who helped you is perusing the veggies as well. I never say anything or talk about what I do, but when you say thank you. I nod, say youre welcome, a small smile will creep across my face and I will walk away, and HOPE you never have to call me again. not because I dont like you, but because I want you to be safe.


~Be the change you wish to see in the world~

~gandhi

Dad__2_max50

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Rated +1 | Posted over 6 years ago

 

Thank you for your post.  I like to think of us as a special breed.

Pub2_saturday_may_13_2006_op_800x759_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

Thanks for the post.Unless an officer has been in our center for more then a short visit, they really do not have a clue what all we do. We just got a new Sgt over our squad. Our last Sgt had been with us for 5 years. Our new Sgt has been with the police department for a long time, but  God Bless him...........told us, he had no idea what all we actually did, until he came in here.It has opened his eyes up a lot he says.He has been a welcome addition .I really wish, the police department, would require the officers to spend at least a full shift( and during a normallly busy time, including shift changes ), to see what all we actually do. Have them listen to our calls, listen in on the police channels, to hear all we hear,and are responsible for. To see what running a subject really entails, especially when they are out of state too. As a Dispatcher, I also realize what all the officers do out there. So I really appreciate when someone takes the time to recognize what we do too.The simple thank you's we may get, along with hearing the words, that an officer is 10-4, is all we really need.Thank you for taking this time to post to us all!

Telecommunicator_rusch_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

Yes, thank you Mike... BUMP!!!


September 11, 2001... I will always remember

Dscn2066_max50

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+2

Rated +2 | Posted over 6 years ago

 

Why We do it !   Just like officers firemen and ems workers ect .. I think you are born to do it !  the voice in the dark the calm before and after the storm .. it is a calling I have been doing it since i was about 20 wow a long time love it and wouldnt trade it for any other job .. pay is not the best trust me . but it is more then that ..


I have posted this beofre however I love it ! hope you all enjoy it !!!!


¡?**You can carry on more than 4 conversations simultaneously!?


?**You have a bladder capacity of a tanker!?


**You can resume a conversation with co-workers 4 hours later, in mid-sentence and everyone knows that you are talking about!?


**You have a long term telephonic relationship with one or more ?paranoid schizophrenic PTSD suffering relatives of a public official.


**You have ever had to explain to a college educated, gainfully employed, tax paying property owner that: His/her child's lack of interest in vegetables was not a police matter!



**You have ever muttered the phrase: "They let him carry a GUN?"


**You find yourself typing "height" and "weight" instead of "width" and "height" when adding dimensions to the HTML "IMG SRC" tags on your web-site.


**You answer your home phone "9-1-1, what is your emergency?"


**You spend more on fast food than utilities.


**You see nothing wrong with eating a Taco Bell Grande Meal or pizza at 3 a.m


**You consider coffee an indispensable work tool.


**You answer your home phone "dispatch".


**You answer dispatch phone "hell" instead of "hello".


**The only thing that gets your adrenaline going is the walk to and from your car.


**You find humor in other people's misery.


**You're only happy if you have something to complain about.


**You consider patience a weakness ,not a virtue.


**Your idea of a good night involves someone burning a house down, getting shot, chased or dismembered.--->My guys have already told me that this was wrote for me!!!


**You have forgotten what it is like to actually eat a warm meal.


**Your dog doesn't recognize you and the kids think you're just the person who drops by every now and then to bring groceries and do the laundry.


**You think it's funny when a would-be suicide gets bored waiting for the gas from the stove to do it's thing and lights a cigarette to pass the time resulting in an explosion that leaves her neighbors homeless but she still survives.


**You truly believe stupidity should be painful.


**Dinner consist of a 2 liter bottle of soda and whatever you can scrounge out of the vending machine.


**Antacid tablets, or better known as dispatcher candy, become your regular desert.


**You read newspaper accounts of a major incident that occurred during your shift and can point out all the incorrect information...and then laugh about it.


**Family members comment about how nice you "used" to be before you started this job.


**You believe in aerial spraying of Prozac and/or birth control over certain parts of your city.


**You have no idea what a holiday is, other than it's the day when everyone gets drunk and beats up their family members.


**You get impatient listening to people relate a story - You want "just the facts".


**You believe 90% of people can't look up a telephone number.


**You get easily bored with happy content people.


**You can talk on the phone, listen to the radio and type request into the computer at the same time without missing anything.


**You think it is funny when a "regular client" kills himself while breaking into a business.


**You can give directions to any location in your city off the top of your head.


**You can relate a 10 minute story over a 2 hour time period, after many interruptions, without losing your place.


**You refuse to allow anyone to say "have a quiet shift".

Policelinkbadge_max160_max160_max50

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Rated +2 | Posted over 6 years ago

 

I recently recommended that the dispatchers be paid ten percent more than the police officers. 

Photo_user_blank_big

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

Sheepdog267, I am not sure that the dispatchers would ever get 10% more pay than the LEO on the road; however I do feel that Emergency Dispatchers should recieve benefits under the Administrative Special Risk category.  As it stands in Florida 911 dispatchers have to put in a full thirty (30) years of service in order to retire with only 48% of their average salary.  If they could be put under the Administrative Special Risk category they could retire in only 25 years in the Florida State Retirement System.


I dispatched for a little over two (2) years and I really enjoyed my job as a dispatcher, but I can honestly tell you the skill level and mental acuity required to function in a busy 911 center makes it very difficult for dispatchers to reach that thirty (30) year mark.  The shift work and stress frequently lead to medical problems *God Bless You Jan*, that force the hard worked dispatchers to retire early which in return lead to significant FRS penalties.


When I was Employed with the SO our CPT offered all of us dispatchers a letter, and all information reguarding this.  We all sent letters to our local senator and representatives; however the request was shot down.  I feel that if enough dispatchers got together to adv. on this subject maybe things could change for the better.

Mr_and_mrs_bledsoe_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

Thank you so much for the compliments to our profession.  And I will tell you 2 ways I do it: 


1.  I love it. 


2.  Coffee...lots and lots of coffee


A woman is like a tea bag - You never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water.

100_1073_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

Thank you for the kind words.  Every little "pat on the back" is welcomed!!


And I agree with Velcro911---lots and lots of coffee!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Quickley-b240_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

I agree with everyone of you, a dispatcher is responsible for the lives of all LEO's on the road, they have to be aware of everything going on around them and on the road. The dispatcher is responsible for getting back up to another officer and to keep up on every call that is dispatched. I always took the time to come over and bring "doughnuts" of all things and to see if they needed anything from the road. I did this mostly when I worked mids and had time. They in  turn took very good care of me. I was told, way before I came on, in the very early years on my department that the guys had to call in from the road to get their calls.


"The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of moral crisis, do nothing." Dante

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

When I first started in LE, I dispatched and am now amazed at the improvements in technology that have improved the speed of communications in our 911 EOCs. During my FTI training it was required for me to do a 911 "ride-a-long" which gave me the big picture of what happened when a call was received there. I also was fortunate enough to work with the dispatchers who take care of district where I work. It helped me put a face with the voice I hear and makes it easier for me to talk with them directly via phone or radio. It is an absolutely AWESOME job they do every day and they all have a great deal of my respect.

Cheryl02_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

I agree dispatchers are our backbone... I was a dispatcher for two years and I greatley appreciate a good dispatcher

Quickley-b240_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

bpd072 says ...



I agree dispatchers are our backbone... I was a dispatcher for two years and I greatley appreciate a good dispatcher



That is the key, Good dispatcher.


"The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in times of moral crisis, do nothing." Dante

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PL Mentoring Team Member

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Picture_018_max600_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

Wish we could get compliments like that more often! It's really good to hear every now and then!


***Life is not measured by the breaths you take, but by the moments that take you breath away***

Samp134754c0b5af0df7_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

Like some already mentioned, it's DEFINITELY not for everyone!

Sparkle_girl_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

noznbook says ...



Thank you for the kind words.  Every little "pat on the back" is welcomed!!


And I agree with Velcro911---lots and lots of coffee!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!









Pat on the backDispatchers rock...and they do deserve a pat on the back...OFTEN!! So here's a pat on the back to all of you!!


I Don't look back for long, I keep looking Forward!
From every human being there rises a light that reaches straight to heaven.

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

A TRIBUTE TO DISPATCHERS


By Chief Thomas Wagoner, Loveland Co. PD




Someone once asked me if I thought that answering telephones for a living was a profession. I said, "I thought it was a calling."And so is dispatching. I have found in my law enforcement career that dispatchers are the unsung heroes of public safety. They miss the excitement of riding in a speeding car with lights flashing and sirens wailing. They can only hear of the bright orange flames leaping from a burning building. They do not get to see the joy on the face of worried parents as they see their child begin breathing on its own, after it has been given CPR.


Dispatchers sit in darkened rooms looking at computer screens and talking to voices from faces they never see. It's like reading a lot of books, but only half of each one.


Dispatchers connect the anxious conversations of terrified victims, angry informants, suicidal citizens and grouchy officers. They are the calming influence of all of them - the quiet, competent voices in the night that provide the pillars for the bridges of sanity and safety. They are expected to gather information from highly agitated people who can't remember where they live, what their name is, or what they just saw. And then, they are to calmly provide all that information to the officers, firefighters, or paramedics without error the first time and every time.


Dispatchers are expected to be able to do five things at once - and do them well. While questioning a frantic caller, they must type the information into a computer, tip off another dispatcher, put another caller on hold, and listen to an officer run a plate for a parking problem. To miss the plate numbers is to raise the officer's ire; to miss the caller's information may be to endanger the same officer's life. But, the officer will never understand that.


Dispatchers have two constant companions, other dispatchers and stress. They depend on one, and try to ignore the other. They are chastened by upset callers, taken for granted by the public, and criticized by the officers. The rewards they get are inexpensive and infrequent, except for the satisfaction they feel at the end of a shift, having done what they were expected to do.


Dispatchers come in all shapes and sizes, all races, both sexes, and all ages. They are blondes, and brunettes, and redheads. They are quiet and outgoing, single, or married, plain, beautiful, or handsome. No two are alike, yet they are all the same. They are people who were selected in a difficult hiring process to do an impossible job. They are as different as snowflakes, but they have one thing in common. They care about people and they enjoy being the lifeline of society - that steady voice in a storm - the one who knows how to handle every emergency and does it with style and grace; and, uncompromised competence.


Dispatchers play many roles; therapist, doctor, lawyer, teacher, weatherman, guidance counselor, psychologist, priest, secretary, supervisor, politician, and reporter. And few people must jump through the emotional hoops on the trip through the joy of one callers birthday party, to the fear of another callers burglary in progress, to the anger of a neighbor blocked in their drive, and back to the birthday callers all in a two minute time frame. The emotional roller coaster rolls to a stop after an 8 or 10 hour shift, and they are expected to walk down to their car with steady feet and no queasiness in their stomach - because they are dispatchers. If they hold it in, they are too closed. If they talk about it, they are a whiner. If it bothers them, it adds more stress. If it doesn't, they question themselves, wondering why.


 

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

Dispatchers are expected to have:                                                                                                             


-the compassion of Mother Theresa;

-the wisdom of Solomon;

-the interviewing skills of Oprah Winfrey;

-the gentleness of Florence Nightingale;

-the patience of Job;

-the voice of Barbara Streisand;

-the knowledge of Einstein;

-the answers of Ann Landers;

-the humor of David Letterman;

-the investigative skills of Sgt. Joe Friday;

-the looks of Melanie Griffith or Don Johnson;

-the faith of Billy Graham;

-the energy of Charo;

-and the endurance of the Energizer Bunny.

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Rate This | Posted about 6 years ago

 

   I as a road officer do have a strong appreciation for "Dispatch".    Rookie Officers usually get to meet them briefly, but there is no time spent with them other than radio traffic.   So they have no idea what goes on thru the shift in Dispatch.  So I occasionally get to hear complaints when the rookie doesn't get something back on the radio as quik as he/she would like.  I'm not an F.T.O., but I do use the opportunity to advise them of what goes on in there, and to be patient.   Most all of them begin to see the true light after that.     I have seen the love Dispatchers have for their job, and know its just like mine for the road.   Once again thank you.

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

LOVE,  LOTS OF LOVE.  THATS HOW I DO IT.   I LOVE MY COMMUNITY.  I LOVE MY FAMILY.  BOTH FAMILIES.  THE ONE I WAS RAISED WITH AND THE ONE I WORK WITH.   I GREW UP AROUND LAW ENFORCEMENT SO I KNEW WHEN I SIGNED UP WHAT THE HOURS WOULD BE LIKE AND WHAT THE STRESS LEVEL WOULD BE.  WHAT A PERSON CAN NEVER UNDERSTAND IS THE EMOTIONAL TOLL SOME CALLS CAN TAKE ON YOU.    WHEN IT FEELS LIKE TOO MUCH I TAKE A DEEP BREATH, OPEN MY LOCKER, LOOK AT MY NIECES AND NEPHEW AND SAY THATS WHY I GOT UP THIS MORNING. 

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

1) I DONT KNOW ANYTHING ELSE AND I DONT CARE TOO, I LOVE MY JOB


2) I DO IT FOR MY RESPONDERS BECUASE WITH OUT THEM, SOCIETY GOES TO SHI*


3) I FEEL GOOD AFTER I DO A GOOD JOB ON HIGH PRIORITY CALLS & IM USED TO NOT ALWAYS HEARING IT FROM ANYONE ELSE BUT OTHER DISPATCHERS


4) I REALLY DO IT FOR THE FREE UNIFORMS, THEY FIT GREAT AND I DONT HAVE TO DO LAUNDRY, THEY DEFINATELY COMPLIMENT MY COMPLEXION

Me1_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 5 years ago

 

Enigma says ...



1) I DONT KNOW ANYTHING ELSE AND I DONT CARE TOO, I LOVE MY JOB


2) I DO IT FOR MY RESPONDERS BECUASE WITH OUT THEM, SOCIETY GOES TO SHI*


3) I FEEL GOOD AFTER I DO A GOOD JOB ON HIGH PRIORITY CALLS & IM USED TO NOT ALWAYS HEARING IT FROM ANYONE ELSE BUT OTHER DISPATCHERS


4) I REALLY DO IT FOR THE FREE UNIFORMS, THEY FIT GREAT AND I DONT HAVE TO DO LAUNDRY, THEY DEFINATELY COMPLIMENT MY COMPLEXION



Wow!!  You get free uniforms???   Seriously, but we don't.     Ditto on items 1) - 3)  lol


LOVEY

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Rate This | Posted about 5 years ago

 

dispatching can be tough I would like to see all LEO work in dispatch for a month or so before they are assigned an FTO