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Taking the job home

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032_max50

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Posted over 6 years ago

 

How many officers take the job home with them? What's the best way for family members to be supportive?

Patton_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

Mary, most cops take the job home,, Over a period of time this could become a problem "depending" on the type of dept, and type of person the officer is. The officer will be a cop every day even off duty and submerge them selves in cop stuff even off duty or they can take off the badge at the end of the day and live what might be called a "normal " life out of character. The important thing to remember is that the toll that being a COP plays on you and your family is NOT personal, do not associate bad moods, mood swings, silence or hyperactivity, or lack of activity with your ability to be a good wife, spouce, mother, girlfriend ect. You can help by being yourself, being a good listener.

There is a Book ALL LEO Spouces and officers need to read EMOTIONAL SURVIVAL for LAW ENFORCEMENT "A Guide for Officers and Families. Kevin M. Gilmartin, PH.D wrote this book and it IS the best book on the market today for Officers and families,, it explains things that you as a significant other realy need to know and that officers need to know so that when those emotional buttons are pushed and mental welfare and attitude start to waiver due to the "job" it can be understood and avoided by all involved. I took a class by Mr. Gilmartin and believe me when I say it was a true eye opener, my wife has read his book three times and it realy has helped us understand how my job has effected our long range relationship,, we are doing much better today because of this book and Mr Gilmartins ability to relate such a taboo subject to Law Enforcement at work and at home.

White_shark_catching_a_cape_fur_seal_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

When I worked for NDOC, I took the job home with me all the time. It's what I do. It's how I dealt with the stress on the job (which was mostly from Prison Administration). Basically my wife says I'm still an A@#hole even now after having left about 9 months ago. Oh well....

1499877653_ae026b51d3_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

I think it depends on how you personally decompress after you go off duty. My wife and I are both in law enforcement so we decompress by basically telling each other the highlights and lowlights of our days as soon as we see each other. Some people dont work like that though, you may need a little time to yourself to get out of "COP MODE" and back in to being a human again. Good luck...

P8080012_max50

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Rate This | Posted over 6 years ago

 

"Taking the job home" is a pitfall in this line of work, but I think alot of it has to do with the "inner makeup" of the person themselves. Myself, I like to question everything and a couple years ago I had a prick of a sgt. and it lead to a whole lot of head butting. I also worried and questioned stuff that I have absolutely no control over. A couple years of this and it actually lead to health issues. For some reason I picked up a bad bout of vertigo and couldn't figure out why. A couple trips to the DR. and a phone call to a close personal friend (an ENT Dr.) and I was told that stress had caused the vertigo. My friend the ENT Dr. told me that this was the way of my body telling me "enough's enough" and I'm shutting down. So, I'm now on Lexapro due to me not being able to "let go" of stuff that I have no control over. Funny how none of this happened when I was actually healthier and working out a couple times a week.


I found out (the hard way) that life is to short and to forget about the job completely when I'm off work. I turn off the work phone and try my best not to "talk shop" when I'm off work. At this point, I go to work, do my eight, and head to the gate. You military people understand that one completely I bet.