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Misunderstood in corrections

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Dscn0118_max50

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Posted about 7 years ago

 

I been in corrections for over 12 years and I consider myself a veteran. Whats the deal with corrections officers who go to the road and get a "I'm better than you" complex. Don't forget where you came from. Some of the best training you recieved was in corrections.

One_badass_razorback_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I have to admit that corrections officers receive some of the best hand to hand combat tactics. I have some friends who are corrections officers and they teach me things they have learned when dealing with inmates cause technically that is who police officers deal with. Either they are on their way in or out and every bit of training helps. My hat's off to you guys.

Car_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I was heading home after work one day and I stopped for a drink at the local Circle K and I still was in uniform. As I walked in I spotted a deputy from a neighboring county. Being professional I said “hey how you doing” I got a who the hell are you look and nothing else. As he started walking for the door I notified him in a few simple words that I was displeased with his actions. Now I don’t know if it was because I had a detention rocker above my patch or if it was a dept. vs dept thing but it was unprofessional anyway you look at it.


J1604

Wolf_max160_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I work in a valley where there are 3 local agencies working side by side. The fact that we all start out training at the same academy and have similar General Orders/Municodes to follow makes it easy to get along. There is more static in the actual Academy training center between the training staff (again made of the 3 agencies) then there is with the guys on the road.


Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth. -George Washington

Akc_001_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I'll never forget my days as a new deputy in the county jail still have some of those scars, much respect for you guys.

Img_1129_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Did a little, and I mean a little bit of time working at the downtown San Diego County Jail. I was lucky and went out to the road very quickly. A very close friend of mine has chosen to stay in the jail even though he is road qualified and a full peace officer. In California, Correction Deputies and Deputies have varying degrees of academy and authority.

It is where he wants to be and he loves it. Me on the other hand, I couldn't stand it, felt like I was back onboard a Navy ship with all the passage ways and walls with no windows. Hard job with almost zero appreciation to what it takes to do it. Hats off to you that do it!

Dscn0118_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I was very pleased with the responses from my topic. Corrections is a hard job to stay with and you need have a inner quality about yourself to do so. My father was a Illinois State Trooper for 30 years , He was the one who told me to stay with Corrections. He is gone now but I am gretaful for his advice , A great old man with lots of knowledge.

2004_0304macandanna0005_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

I love what I do. I work the jail in Prescott AZ. I am in court services and we get to see the bad guys get what's coming to them. I started out a floor officer and I guess in some ways still am. Detention is not for everyone, that's for sure. No glory and little respect from your fellow officers on the road. You have a badge and a uniform, train as hard as anyone but it carries little wieght. We must be crazy to do this job but if you ask the ones that have been doing it for awhile they wouldn't have it any other way.

Dscn1049_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

it's a different game out on the streets, But I do feel that if you start your career in a jail you have an edge. You get to observe numerous criminals, see how they act and talk. If you pay attention you can learn little tricks that they do to conceal things and steal things. If you soak in the things that you have learned and apply them to street situations you tend to notice a little more.

Img_1129_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Rcbaron said:

it's a different game out on the streets, But I do feel that if you start your career in a jail you have an edge. You get to observe numerous criminals, see how they act and talk. If you pay attention you can learn little tricks that they do to conceal things and steal things. If you soak in the things that you have learned and apply them to street situations you tend to notice a little more.

That is a massive advantage, and way more than just an edge. Police officers for the most part have to learn on the fly or be shown the ropes as they encounter situations in thier career. The Deputy who did time in the trenches as a jailer first gets to be immersed in a hands on culture that is providing an upfront and personal education in criminal behavior....most of the time at the control of the officer.

Draw_baton_sq90_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

IVE BEEN BEHIND THE WALL FOR 3 YEARS AND ON CERT FOR CLOSE TO A YEAR AND HAVE LOST A LOT OFFICERS WHETHER TO INTEGRITY ISSUES OR JUST CHOOSING ANOTHER L.E PATH. BUT THIS JOB IS NOT A TEXT BOOK JOB IT'S 90% HANDS ON. BUT IM SURE IT HAPPENS YOU CALL OUT THERE NAME AND THEY LOOK AT YOU LIKE THEY NEED GLASSES !!

Deadman_pirate_flag_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

To be quite honest, many police officers, admittedly, myself included, judge the value/experience of a LEO by how much time he/she has spent on the street. I hate to say it, but in my experience it's usually been an accurate gauge, at least in my neck of the woods.

I currently work on a multi-jurisdictional task force with several members who got out of the academy and got tapped for narcotics right off the rip, and several others who were tapped while working in the local jail. As much as I love them all, I have to admit that their lack of experience shows when compared to those of us who paid our dues on patrol.

Police-19_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

mpg6308 said:

I been in corrections for over 12 years and I consider myself a veteran. Whats the deal with corrections officers who go to the road and get a "I'm better than you" complex. Don't forget where you came from. Some of the best training you recieved was in corrections.

Honestly my 7 years corrections has helped me alot on the road.


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Deadman_pirate_flag_max50

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Rate This | Posted about 7 years ago

 

Fender1604 said:


I was heading home after work one day and I stopped for a drink at the local Circle K and I still was in uniform. As I walked in I spotted a deputy from a neighboring county. Being professional I said “hey how you doing” I got a who the hell are you look and nothing else. As he started walking for the door I notified him in a few simple words that I was displeased with his actions. Now I don’t know if it was because I had a detention rocker above my patch or if it was a dept. vs dept thing but it was unprofessional anyway you look at it.


Perhaps the officer was having a bad day. It happens to the best of us. At any rate, I wouldn't take it to heart. You're doing your part, and should be proud of what you do. If anybody has a problem with it, then it's on them.