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2010 Marks Record Low for NYPD Fatal Police-Involved Shootings

2010 Marks Record Low for NYPD Fatal Police-Involved Shootings

City cops were involved in 105 shootings in 2009 - matching 2008's low, a report found.

New York Daily News via YellowBrix

January 12, 2011

NEW YORK CITYNYPD officers logged a record low number of fatal police-involved shootings last year, a new report shows.

Last year, cops shot and killed eight people, wounding 16 others. The numbers are a sharp decrease from 2009, when police killed 12 and wounded 20.

The report also shows there were 93 police-shooting incidents, which include accidental discharges and the shooting of animals. It was the first year that number fell below 100 in the 40 years police have been keeping records, the stats show.

City cops were involved in 105 shootings in 2009 – matching 2008’s low, a report found. In 1972, cops logged a record high 994 incidents.

“It is a tribute to the police officers’ training and restraint, as well as a reflection of a safer city, that fatalities have plummeted despite an increase in police numbers and in the capacity of their firearms,” said Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly.

In 1971, the first year of recordkeeping, police shot and killed 93 people and wounded 221.

The same year, the department employed 4,000 fewer officers than the 35,000 on the job today. Prior to 1993, police officers were issued a six-shot revolver. Now NYPD officers carry 16-shot semiautomatic pistols.

NYPD statistics also show that the city has the lowest police-involved shootings of any law enforcement department in the nation with last year’s ratio of only 0.34 per 1,000 officers.


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