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Early Release: 48 of 56 Freed Inmates Back in Jail

Early Release: 48 of 56 Freed Inmates Back in Jail

The AP via YellowBrix

January 11, 2010

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — When Gov. Pat Quinn halted a secret early prison release program last week, he acknowledged that 56 of the freed inmates were already back behind bars — 48 of them for violating rules of their parole.

What he didn’t say was that those broken rules included at least 17 allegations of violent crimes, including attempted murder, armed robbery and domestic battery, according to Associated Press interviews and reviews of both public and internal Corrections Department documents.

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One offender who’s back after he was released under the program known as “MGT Push” allegedly shot his victim in the leg. Victims of nine others who earned return trips to the penitentiary contend they were battered.

Seven parolees are back in lockup for crimes involving guns or other weapons.

Two who returned after arrests on domestic battery allegations could have been picked up by the Corrections Department earlier, following busts for less serious crimes, but were not.

The cases represent new problems for Quinn, who already is facing intense criticism over MGT Push — so-named because it refers to giving prisoners “meritorious good time” credit.

The program, and how much Quinn knew about it before The Associated Press revealed its existence in December, have become major issues in the governor’s race. The primary union for prison guards and parole officers this week issued the latest call for a legislative investigation.

MGT Push involved secretly changing a Corrections policy that required inmates to stay a minimum of 61 days. Inmates also were given as much as six months’ time off for good conduct as soon as they arrived, before they had a chance to display any conduct, good or bad.

That made inmates – some of them violent — eligible for release in as little as three weeks, including county jail time. Quinn has stressed that even without MGT Push, discretionary awards of good-conduct credit would have qualified them for release in another month or two.

When he reinstated the minimum-stay policy and announced other reforms on Dec. 30, Quinn said eight MGT Push parolees were back in prison serving sentences for new crimes including domestic battery, aggravated drunken driving, theft and drug charges. A ninth was returned for a new drug sentence the next day.

The remainder of the 56 he labeled “technical violations” held over parolees’ heads for not following the rules.

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  • Photo_user_blank_big

    granny1

    over 4 years ago

    1448 Comments

    i agree with akangel.

  • Angel_kincaid_park_2014_max50

    AKangel

    over 4 years ago

    4972 Comments

    Let's See, convicted felons of violent crimes out for good behavior! HUM! REALLY! They are repeat offenders of violent crimes.... WTH? I agree with fisherda charge them for their stay, Oh if they can't pay in a timely manner send them to collections. SICK AND TIRED OF PAYING FOR THESE LOSERS TO SIT AND WATCH TV, WORKOUT AND HAVE THREE MEALS A DAY.

  • Police_car_max50

    MidnightMike

    over 4 years ago

    470 Comments

    Can the Probation and Parole Offices that are affected by these programs handle the increase in their caseloads? If I had to guess, they are already stretched thin like the rest of us...

  • Car6_max50

    Ahi

    over 4 years ago

    1990 Comments

    That was a really stupid idea, and if money is the issue, start charging them for their stay. If they can't afford it, then they need to work it off. I'm tired of paying for their nice stay away from home, stop making it so nice for them.

  • Advance_seal_max50

    P89Hydra

    over 4 years ago

    740 Comments

    Times are tough and its getting expensive housing all this scum. I hope they work something out, that doesn't have these people coming back out.

  • Shrel-only_max50

    ERIC4536

    over 4 years ago

    534 Comments

    Kcummings said it very well "I am shocked. Simply shocked. SHOCKED, I tell you! Who would have thought that repeat offenders allowed out on early release for "good behavior" would......(dare I say it?).... REPEAT OFFEND! What did anyone expect from ILL.

  • Badge_image_max50

    kcummings

    over 4 years ago

    8 Comments

    I am shocked. Simply shocked. SHOCKED, I tell you! Who would have thought that repeat offenders allowed out on early release for "good behavior" would......(dare I say it?).... REPEAT OFFEND! This is simply a turn of events I would have NEVER seen coming. To quote a great mind from "The Princess Bride" motion picture: "Inconceivable!" *shakes head incredulously*

  • 432nd_tfw_patch_max50

    fsa0033

    over 4 years ago

    324 Comments

    They were sent there for a reason. Keep them there for the time ordered. There shouldn't be any time off for any behavior. If anything they should get more time. Any official that lets a criminal out early and that person (POS) hurts someone then that official should spend time in jail/prison. I think that should curb any feelings for these criminals. What a crock. Anyone considering early release for criminals haven't had a family member or themselves accosted by these creeps. Morons.

  • 119_1923_max50

    TPD327

    over 4 years ago

    396 Comments

    You've got it all wrong. The Gov is just trying to set the table for early release for himself and his pals. We've got one former Gov in prison right now with another on the way. ;<)

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Anonymous

    over 4 years ago

    The recidivism rate in the US is almost 70%! and the Gov. of Ill wants to release savages...I mean convicts out on the streets,because of BS goodtime?! Has he ever spent a an hour or a day with felons convicted of violent crimes? he would probably piss his pants and beg them not to hurt him. Rehabilitation for violent convicted felons only exists in theory NOT reality.

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Anonymous

    over 4 years ago

    It's amazing the type of people that you deal with when you deal with convicted felons! You try to give the a second chance and they screw it up and are back behind bars for committing new (sometimes violent) crimes.

    These early release programs that some states are considering are NOT a good idea! These people need to finish out the time that they were sentenced to!

  • Steve_mcqueen_max50

    ilegworldchamp

    over 4 years ago

    8966 Comments

    "SEND THEM ALL TO 1600 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE FOR REHABILITATION WITH THE A.C.L.U. AND THE REST OF THE A-D-D-MINI-STRATION".

  • 911flag_max50

    JTortorice

    over 4 years ago

    58 Comments

    This just goes to show how our bleeding heart government does'nt want the bad guys to stay in prison,he must be a bleeding heart liberal.....

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Anonymous

    over 4 years ago

    "Quinn has stressed that even without MGT Push, discretionary awards of good-conduct credit would have qualified them for release in another month or two."

    In my myopic little view of things, that tells me the rewards system needs serious overhaul. What "good conduct" can a rapist or batterer earn in prison that qualifies him to go out and beat someone again? As a former CO, I'm sure there are some few who have learned their lesson and can go out and behave themselves, but there are a hell of a lot more who can't. Those convicted of violent crimes should not be allowed to even earn "good time," much less get good behavior releases.

    But I guess some of our elected officials are slow to learn.

  • Cars---mater-02_max50

    chrissanders

    over 4 years ago

    5232 Comments

    Im surprised. Once a criminal, always a criminal.

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