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The Police Entrance Exam - Vehicle Pursuits

The Police Entrance Exam - Vehicle Pursuits

Sergeant George Godoy

The information presented here is meant to be used as a rule of thumb guideline for vehicle pursuit questions on police entrance exams. Both the police written test and the oral board interview may include judgment questions regarding vehicle pursuits. Police agencies do not want to hire someone who disregards the safety of the public in order to stop a vehicle for a minor traffic violation.

Vehicle pursuits are always regulated by jurisdictional policies and applicable city, state, and federal laws. This article is intended to provide a common sense approach to vehicle pursuits based on a compilation of different police policies from several jurisdictions.

Decision To Initiate A Vehicle Pursuit


The officer intending to stop a vehicle will make every effort to avoid a vehicle pursuit. Activation of lights and siren are delayed whenever possible, until the officer is close enough that the opportunity to flee appears to be unavailable to the operator of the suspect vehicle.

If the operator of the suspect vehicle chooses to avoid being stopped and attempts to flee, the decision to initiate a vehicle pursuit lies with the individual officer.

Certain actions taken by the operator of the fleeing vehicle may escalate the danger to the public, the suspect operator, and the pursuing officer(s). In these cases, jurisdictional policy will prevail in determining whether a pursuit is continued or called off.

Any officer involved in a vehicle pursuit must drive with due regard for the safety of all persons concerned and any exemptions granted the officer, as an authorized operator of an emergency vehicle, do not include protection from the consequences of that officer driving with reckless disregard for the safety of others.

A vehicle pursuit study, covering 800 municipal and county agencies, indicated that two factors were likely to determine support for a vehicle pursuit:

1. The severity of the offense committed by the suspect

2. The risk to the public (traffic, road, and weather conditions)

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    denestu

    over 1 year ago

    24 Comments

    In pursuit of criminals, law enforcement officers sometimes must give chase, and that includes on foot and in vehicles. Police pursuits on foot might result in someone near the officer and suspect taking an accidental fall when one or both of them go down in a scuffle. Pursuits in a police vehicle, however, pose the greatest risk to all involved, including the general public, and can end in deaths and the destruction of property or an automobile donation.

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    StarkFace

    over 2 years ago

    30 Comments

    Very good stuff to think about. Kinda disappointed to hear about Denver PD's restrictions, though.

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    stehen

    about 4 years ago

    2 Comments

    How can anybody take a decision like that, a wise decision, when they actually have like 2 seconds. The majority of police officers think about that the person driving that car is a dangerous one and he can hurt others. Can a police officer be charged if something goes wrong during the pursuit?
    used cars Trenton

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    Anonymous

    about 5 years ago

    good info

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    spastic

    about 5 years ago

    10 Comments

    I think that everyone that is considering a career in law enforcement should definately take this exam,but before taking the exam they should look at the overview then take the quiz.It most definately helpful to take criminal justice courses as well to better understand the true aspects of what to exspect in the law enforcement field.

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    spastic

    about 5 years ago

    10 Comments

    I Think that this is good information to know considering I am a Criminal Justice major at Indian River State College and working for the Indian River County Sheriffs department as a volunteer deputy in their general services department.

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    Anonymous

    over 5 years ago

    My department's pursuit policy is somewhat lenient. We are authorized to pursue any offender if they are, in fact, fleeing from justice for any violation of the law. As soon as a pursuit becomes too dangerous or unneeded we are to use our common sense and good judgement to either continue/discontinue.

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    JoelAHermanson

    over 5 years ago

    28 Comments

    good info

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    Anonymous

    over 5 years ago

    Excuse me add to this to former post. It helps a lot to know the LAW!

  • Photo_user_blank_big

    Anonymous

    over 5 years ago

    This is so good. Basic and common sense applys. It takes experience to form a basic instint that requires action. Definitely a start. Thanks

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    shielding_wings

    over 5 years ago

    2 Comments

    Im a student of Criminal justice at Itt-technical... funny thing is this is more helpful than the text on the related issues O.O

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    Anonymous

    over 5 years ago

    This helped clarify a lot of questions I had!

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    rickykirkham

    almost 6 years ago

    244 Comments

    Great information. I just learned alot.

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    CValencia

    about 6 years ago

    10 Comments

    This is a grate study guide "it's so easy"

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    cdizzle6984

    about 6 years ago

    2 Comments

    ive seen too many high speed pursuits in my area many of them ending horribly, Like 2 of them have gone inot other ppls houses and killed them.

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